evocativesynthesis:

Herculaneum (by davetonkin)

Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town destroyed by volcanic pyroclastic flows AD 79, located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano, in the Italian region of Campania in the shadow of Mt. Vesuvius.

evocativesynthesis:

Herculaneum (by davetonkin)

Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town destroyed by volcanic pyroclastic flows AD 79, located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano, in the Italian region of Campania in the shadow of Mt. Vesuvius.

brassivydesign:

Male Triton Gold Armband
Greek, Hellenisticca, 200 B.C.
This imposing serpentine armband represents a male triton holding a small winged Eros. The hoops behind the tritons’ head were used to attach the armband to the sleeves of a garment, for otherwise, its weight (over 6 1/2 ounces) would have caused them to slip down the arms.
There is matching female triton armband that can be seen at the click-through link
Photo by Brass Ivy Design, Object at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

brassivydesign:

Male Triton Gold Armband

Greek, Hellenistic
ca, 200 B.C.

This imposing serpentine armband represents a male triton holding a small winged Eros. The hoops behind the tritons’ head were used to attach the armband to the sleeves of a garment, for otherwise, its weight (over 6 1/2 ounces) would have caused them to slip down the arms.

There is matching female triton armband that can be seen at the click-through link

Photo by Brass Ivy Design, Object at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

likeavirgil:

Greek vase text posts

Different Names for the Same Thing: The Moon

classicsenthusiast:

All Things Pertaining to the Moon

Ancient Greek

  • selene (σελήνη) - the moon, full moon
  • mene (μήνη) - the moon
  • noumenia (νουμηνία) - the new moon, first of the month
  • aselenos (ἀσέληνος) - moonless,
  • skotomene (σκοτομήνη) - a moonless night
  • dichomenis (διχόμηνις) - at the full moon
  • selenazo (σεληνάζω) - to be moonstruck

Latin

  • lūna, ae - the moon
  • interlūnis, e - at the new moon
  • illūnis, e - moonless, without moonlight
  • lūnula, ae - a little moon (an ornament worn by women)
  • lūnātus, a, um - half-moon-shaped, crescent-shaped
  • sēmestris, e - the full moon (technically, it means semi-monthly)

(Requested by Anonymous)

shatteryourleaves:

Ancient Roman theater at Kaş, Turkey.

shatteryourleaves:

Images from the ruins of the Romano-Pisidian city of Sagalassos, approximately 140 kilometers north of present-day Antalya, Turkey.

ancientart:

Claudius -the 4th emperor of the Roman Empire.

His mother Antonia often called him “a monster of a man” […] and if she accused anyone of dulness, she used to say that he was “a bigger fool than her son Claudius.” […] When his sister Livilla heard that he would be emperor, she openly and loudly prayed that the Roman people might be spared so cruel and undeserved a fortune.”

-Roman historian Suetonius unfavorably speaks of Claudius in ‘The Lives of the Twelve Caesars’ (5.3.2). Rolfe translation.

Claudius ruled the Roman Empire from 41-54 AD, was the grandson of Mark Antony, and step-grandson and grandnephew of Augustus. Claudius suffered from trembling, a limp, and a speech defect, all of which may have been due to cerebral palsy. Because of his physical disabilities, Claudius was originally never considered a candidate for emperorship. This changed when his nephew Caligula, the current emperor, was assassinated. Upon this the rampaging praetorian guards found Claudius terrified, apparently hiding behind a curtain in the palace, and proclaimed the overwhelmed Claudius emperor of Rome.

During his reign Claudius demonstrated excellent management, and was involved in several building projects that improved Rome’s supply of grain and water, such as his construction of the harbour at Ostia. Thrace and Britain were added to the empire under his reign -perhaps partly a way for Claudius to prove himself in response to the opposition he faced from the senate. He died in 54 AD, and the consensus reached by our ancient historians was that he was murdered by poison. It is thought by many that Agrippina was responsible for the poisoning, and did so to secure her son Nero’s appointment of emperorship. Accordingly, Nero became emperor of Rome.

Images used:

Bronze head of Claudius found in Suffolk, England, 1st century AD. Courtesy of the British Museum, P&EE 1965 12-1 1. Photo by Kit.

Emperor Claudius. Marble, found at Gabii. Courtesy of the Louvre, Ma 1231. Photo by Jastrow.

ancientpeoples:

Terracotta lamp 
9.5cm long and 2.4cm high (3 3/4 x 15/16 inch.) 
Roman Period, from Cyprus region, 40 - 100 AD.
Source: Metropolitan Museum 

ancientpeoples:

Terracotta lamp 

9.5cm long and 2.4cm high (3 3/4 x 15/16 inch.) 

Roman Period, from Cyprus region, 40 - 100 AD.

Source: Metropolitan Museum 

ancient-egypts-secrets:

Ma’at, the Winged Egyptian Goddess of Truth, Justice and Harmony. 
19th Dynasty. 
Tomb of pharaoh Siptah (reign as a child 1197 – 1191 BC). 
Valley of the Kings. Western Thebes. Egypt

ancient-egypts-secrets:

Ma’at, the Winged Egyptian Goddess of Truth, Justice and Harmony.

19th Dynasty.

Tomb of pharaoh Siptah (reign as a child 1197 – 1191 BC).

Valley of the Kings. Western Thebes. Egypt

"It’s not the killing. It is the waving about of swords I find tedious. I dare say I can kill people readily enough, as long as they’re not fighting back."

archaicwonder:

Roman Bronze Medical Scalpel, 1st-3rd Century AD

archaicwonder:

Roman Bronze Medical Scalpel, 1st-3rd Century AD