#art
taf-art:

Orthryades, the Dying Spartan (1778). Johan Tobias Sergel.

taf-art:

Orthryades, the Dying Spartan (1778). Johan Tobias Sergel.

artdetails:

Exekias, Achilles and Ajax Playing a Game of Dice (details), 530 BCE

Aerial view of the ruins of Empúries (Emporion: founded by the GreeksEmporiae: allied and occupied by the Romans), Spain.

mortisia:

Cleopatra VII of Egypt dressed like a Pharaoh presenting offerings to Isis, 51 BC. Limestone stele (with an Ancient Greek text) dedicated by a Greek man, Onnophris. 

mortisia:

Cleopatra VII of Egypt dressed like a Pharaoh presenting offerings to Isis, 51 BC. Limestone stele (with an Ancient Greek text) dedicated by a Greek man, Onnophris. 

kriemhildsrevenge:

Pendant in the form of a bull’s head

Greek, Late Classical Period, 400–330 B.C.

The bull is a common form in the 5th and 4th centuries BC worn with string of beads or other pendants or in isolation as here. Associated with various deities and heroes, the bull was important to Classical Greek religion and myth. Its role as a jewelry ornament is less clear, perhaps apotropaic (to ward away harm).

via MFA Boston

ancientpeoples:

Partial relief of Female Musicians
18th Dynasty, New Kingdom, Amarna Period
c.1353-1336 BC
The varied hand positions give an illusion of movement to this troup of female musicians. The second woman from the right is not playing a stringed instrument and it is possible that she is a singer. However, she appears to hold a long slim object in her right hand. Depictions of musical ensembles from Dynasty 18 frequently include a musician playing a pair of slender pipes, and it is possible that this woman is a pipe player.
(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Partial relief of Female Musicians

18th Dynasty, New Kingdom, Amarna Period

c.1353-1336 BC

The varied hand positions give an illusion of movement to this troup of female musicians. The second woman from the right is not playing a stringed instrument and it is possible that she is a singer. However, she appears to hold a long slim object in her right hand. Depictions of musical ensembles from Dynasty 18 frequently include a musician playing a pair of slender pipes, and it is possible that this woman is a pipe player.

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Globular jar of King Merneferre Aya
13th Dynasty, Middle Kingdom
c.1700-1676
(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Globular jar of King Merneferre Aya

13th Dynasty, Middle Kingdom

c.1700-1676

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

clioancientart:

The Chaourse Hoard, a group of elaborate Roman silver serving and drinking vessels, dating to the 2nd and 3rd Centuries AD and buried in about 250 AD in northern France, where it was found in the late 19th Century. Now in The British Museum.. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities.

clioancientart:

The Chaourse Hoard, a group of elaborate Roman silver serving and drinking vessels, dating to the 2nd and 3rd Centuries AD and buried in about 250 AD in northern France, where it was found in the late 19th Century. Now in The British Museum.. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities.

greek-museums:

Monuments of Thessaloniki / The Arch of Galerius:

The Arch of Galerius, or more widely known as Kamara is another famous monument of Thessaloniki. The arch is aligned with the Rotunda and the Palaces of Galerius. (4th century A.D)
The Arch was built in celebration of the defeat of the Sassanid Persians by the Romans.

Thessaloniki’s Antiquities’ Ephorate has been fighting constantly to keep Thessaloniki’s historical past alive within the city, with most prominent the case of the Roman Forum, which was discovered after the great fire of 1917 underneath the burned remnants of the Jewish quarter. The site had been cleared with the intention to build the new Courthouse. Archaeologists were met with a strong resistance on the city’s part who wanted to build the new Courthouse on top of the Roman Forum. One of the latest such cases was the discovery of a portion of the Byzantine city during the excavations for Thessaloniki’s metro line (2013-2014). Court battles ensued again since the municipality wanted the site removed and stored somewhere outside the city. The archaeologists demanded the site to be characterized as a monument and remain in situ with a museum built around it. Finally a settlement, which has not been wholy accepted has been suggested. The site is to be dismantled and transferred away for the completion of the metro line, and then it will be brought back to be installed as a permanent exhibition. However, that doesn’t really involve a thorough rescue excavation.
This policy has not been without its fallacies since it exposed the monuments to the hard reality of a busy city center. During the ’80s, a really dark period for Greece, Kamara sustained various damages due to atmospheric pollution and graffiti. Cleaning methods at the time did not help remove the “ghost” of the graffiti after the removal of the first layers of paint. However, the conservation laboratories of the Ephorate developed a pioneering method including the use of a spray on membrane that could be peeled off removing paint and other dirt thoroughly.
Through time, however, the constancy displayed by archaeologists in the preservation of monuments within the everyday lives of modern citizens, has been steadily paying off. More and more young Greeks develop an appreciation for them that is not rooted in naive nationalism.
The bars installed around the monument are meant to protect it from the possibility of a car accident, since the monument is situated right next to the main avenue of the city (Egnatia Odos), and stray dogs that might be tempted to urinate on the monument.

greek-museums:

Monuments of Thessaloniki / The Arch of Galerius:

The Arch of Galerius, or more widely known as Kamara is another famous monument of Thessaloniki. The arch is aligned with the Rotunda and the Palaces of Galerius. (4th century A.D)

The Arch was built in celebration of the defeat of the Sassanid Persians by the Romans.

Thessaloniki’s Antiquities’ Ephorate has been fighting constantly to keep Thessaloniki’s historical past alive within the city, with most prominent the case of the Roman Forum, which was discovered after the great fire of 1917 underneath the burned remnants of the Jewish quarter. The site had been cleared with the intention to build the new Courthouse. Archaeologists were met with a strong resistance on the city’s part who wanted to build the new Courthouse on top of the Roman Forum. One of the latest such cases was the discovery of a portion of the Byzantine city during the excavations for Thessaloniki’s metro line (2013-2014). Court battles ensued again since the municipality wanted the site removed and stored somewhere outside the city. The archaeologists demanded the site to be characterized as a monument and remain in situ with a museum built around it. Finally a settlement, which has not been wholy accepted has been suggested. The site is to be dismantled and transferred away for the completion of the metro line, and then it will be brought back to be installed as a permanent exhibition. However, that doesn’t really involve a thorough rescue excavation.

This policy has not been without its fallacies since it exposed the monuments to the hard reality of a busy city center. During the ’80s, a really dark period for Greece, Kamara sustained various damages due to atmospheric pollution and graffiti. Cleaning methods at the time did not help remove the “ghost” of the graffiti after the removal of the first layers of paint. However, the conservation laboratories of the Ephorate developed a pioneering method including the use of a spray on membrane that could be peeled off removing paint and other dirt thoroughly.

Through time, however, the constancy displayed by archaeologists in the preservation of monuments within the everyday lives of modern citizens, has been steadily paying off. More and more young Greeks develop an appreciation for them that is not rooted in naive nationalism.

The bars installed around the monument are meant to protect it from the possibility of a car accident, since the monument is situated right next to the main avenue of the city (Egnatia Odos), and stray dogs that might be tempted to urinate on the monument.

yeaverily:

Armband with Triton holding a Putti, Greek 200 BCE

yeaverily:

Armband with Triton holding a Putti, Greek 200 BCE

greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki:

A selection of mosaics found throughout Thessaloniki, displayed in a reconstruction of a Roman residence situated at the garden of the museum. (4th century AD)

Mosaics appear in greek space during prehistoric times and up until the Hellenistic period they are constructed with colourful pebbles. During the Roman period we have the appearance of “tesserae”, the cube tiles made of a variety of materials. Motifs range from floral and geometrical designs to elaborate scenes taken from mythology.

All I can think is that these designs would make some truly great carpets.

Favourite Screen Costumes || Atia’s Egypt outfit (Rome [2007]: 2x09 -  Deus Impeditio Esuritori Nullus (No God Can Stop a Hungry Man)

Costumes by: April Ferry

#art
funeral-wreaths:

Antonio Canova, Theseus Fighting the Centaur, c. 1804-19

funeral-wreaths:

Antonio Canova, Theseus Fighting the Centaur, c. 1804-19

margadirube:

doll61: lalulutres: Richly-detailed fresco on an arched ceiling, Pompeii, 79 AD Bliss ~doll61

margadirube:

doll61lalulutresRichly-detailed fresco on an arched ceiling, Pompeii, 79 AD Bliss ~doll61